theavc:


The best comedy albums of 2012

As this list makes plain, it was a hell of a year for comedy.

This is a good list!

theavc:

The best comedy albums of 2012

As this list makes plain, it was a hell of a year for comedy.

This is a good list!

laughspin:

It’s here!

laughspin:

It’s here!

bbook:


Let’s talk about the Largo show. What was the turning point that made you decide that you were going to open up to everybody like that and that was the time and place you were going to do it? I had been working on a piece—I was going to work this material out possibly forThis American Life before I was diagnosed with cancer. And then after I got diagnosed with cancer, I just couldn’t stop writing. I had this show set up, so I went on stage and I went for the material. I was recording it that night just so I could reference the material and see if it was in a good place to send to Ira Glass. I felt like I did have something that maybe he could use.
What has the response to that performance been like so far?People have been nothing but positive, and I’m just blown away at how supportive and positive everybody has been. Not that I thought everybody would be a jerk to me because I had cancer, but they really lifted me up during this time, and the performance was something that the audience and my peers really have been so supportive and vocal about, which feels nice.
How has the Largo performance impacted your comedy? Have you found yourself changing your style or anything as a result? I haven’t performed since that night. I had surgery; I literally got diagnosed, did that show, and then I’ve been dealing with doctors and being cut open and healing. So I haven’t really been doing anything. I just got my bandages off, so it’s still all very fresh. But I imagine this will change me forever as a human and as a comedian in turn.

Comedian and Cancer Survivor Tig Notaro Knows How To Tell a Good Story

Tig’s new album is available now!

bbook:

Let’s talk about the Largo show. What was the turning point that made you decide that you were going to open up to everybody like that and that was the time and place you were going to do it? 
I had been working on a piece—I was going to work this material out possibly forThis American Life before I was diagnosed with cancer. And then after I got diagnosed with cancer, I just couldn’t stop writing. I had this show set up, so I went on stage and I went for the material. I was recording it that night just so I could reference the material and see if it was in a good place to send to Ira Glass. I felt like I did have something that maybe he could use.

What has the response to that performance been like so far?
People have been nothing but positive, and I’m just blown away at how supportive and positive everybody has been. Not that I thought everybody would be a jerk to me because I had cancer, but they really lifted me up during this time, and the performance was something that the audience and my peers really have been so supportive and vocal about, which feels nice.

How has the Largo performance impacted your comedy? Have you found yourself changing your style or anything as a result? 
I haven’t performed since that night. I had surgery; I literally got diagnosed, did that show, and then I’ve been dealing with doctors and being cut open and healing. So I haven’t really been doing anything. I just got my bandages off, so it’s still all very fresh. But I imagine this will change me forever as a human and as a comedian in turn.

Comedian and Cancer Survivor Tig Notaro Knows How To Tell a Good Story

Tig’s new album is available now!

Laugh Tracks: The Return of the Comedy Album - WSJ.com

Pete Holmes does Comedy Central specials and live shows around the country, writes for sitcoms, does a podcast and voices the baby in E*Trade commercials. But he considers his 2011 debut album, “Impregnated With Wonder,” to be his entry into the comedy pantheon.
"Richard Pryor had albums. Carlin, Cosby, Martin," he says. "It’s one of the few remaining things from their time that we’ve clung to. We can’t do Carson anymore, but at least we can put our big dumb faces on a CD. I mean, you can’t hang a Conan set on your wall."

Laugh Tracks: The Return of the Comedy Album - WSJ.com

Pete Holmes does Comedy Central specials and live shows around the country, writes for sitcoms, does a podcast and voices the baby in E*Trade commercials. But he considers his 2011 debut album, “Impregnated With Wonder,” to be his entry into the comedy pantheon.

"Richard Pryor had albums. Carlin, Cosby, Martin," he says. "It’s one of the few remaining things from their time that we’ve clung to. We can’t do Carson anymore, but at least we can put our big dumb faces on a CD. I mean, you can’t hang a Conan set on your wall."